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Groundbreaking Columbia Orthopedics and Neurology Concussion Algorithm Published

February 12, 2018

Columbia Orthopedics and Columbia Neurology collaborated on research that was recently published in the February issue of Neurology Clinical Practice entitled "Medical retirement from sport after concussions," which detailed a potentially game-changing algorithm that could standardize medical retirement decisions for athletes suffering from sports-related concussion (SRC).

Columbia Orthopedics providers and staff who contributed to the research include Chairman William N. Levine, MD; non-operative sports medicine specialists Thomas S. Bottiglieri, DO and Natasha Desai, MD; and athletic trainer James D. Gossett, ATC.

Dr. Desai on the importance of the algorithm:

"I think that this proposed algorithm is the start of an important conversation that should be had in the sports medicine community. There are many studies and guidelines about the diagnosis of concussion, but there is relatively little out there to guide us in our decision-making in how to approach medical retirement from their sport with our patients. So many factors should be taken into consideration as evidenced by the 10 different cases and it is not a one size fits all. I foresee this algorithm continuing to evolve and improve but it is a great start and has already aided me in my approach to this very difficult conversation."

Dr. Bottiglieri on how this will impact patient care:

"The retirement from sport after concussion paper is a collaborative effort from three disciplines, neurology, sports medicine, and orthopedics. It brings together decades of experience - seeing patients with brain injury from sports participation at the high school, collegiate, and professional ranks. In my own clinical practice, I have found the paper serves both in the discussion of retirement from collision sports after brain injury, but also in everyday practice for sports-related concussion as a means of reassurance to athletes and their families that they are not within the algorithm for retirement discussion. While a paper such as this has its limitations, we hope that it will get the attention of practicing physicians and researchers to establish a base from which we can provide sound advice. More importantly, it can serve as a framework for research projects that can answer the clinical questions that remain regarding the time at which the brain can no longer protect itself from repetitive contact in sport."

 

To read the complete study, visit here.

Follow our providers on social media for more insights on sports medicine:

Dr. Levine - Twitter

Dr. Bottiglieri - Twitter and Instagram

Dr. Desai - Twitter

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